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  • Description: preservation
(33 results)



Display: 20

    • A marvel of Modernism: The hyperbolic paraboloid

    • 2011
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • The mid-century modernist architectural movement (1950s-1960s) espoused the progressive optimism felt during the years following World War II. The hyperbolic paraboloid, a highly distinctive curved shape resembling a saddle, arose out of this...
    • Carpenter Gothic architecture: Its history, care, and repair

    • 2019
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • Revivalist architectural styles were popular during the late 19th and early 20th century, informing the design of residential, commercial, and civic structures. Carpenter Gothic was an offshoot of Gothic Revival, a style popularized in Great...
    • A stone's throw: Asheville's legacy of Pebbledash & Roughcast

    • 2013
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • Pebbledash and roughcast are two types of stucco application that have their roots in ancient building history. Brought to Asheville, NC in the late 19th century by Richard Sharp Smith, the architect tasked with designing Biltmore Village, these...
    • History pasted on the wall

    • 2006
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • Invented by the Chinese as early as 200 A.D., wallpaper has a storied history across numerous cultures and continents. Because it is susceptible to frequent changes as a result of stylistic trends and personal tastes, as well as damage and...
    • Architecture with a capital A: The importance of preserving the A-Frame

    • 2011
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • A distinctive architectural form born of the post-war modernist design movement, the A-frame structure has typically not been viewed as significant enough to receive historic preservation attention. This brief argues that A-frame structures,...
    • Lost history: Happy Hill and freedman's enclaves

    • 2006
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • Following Emancipation and the end of the Civil War, freed African-Americans built their own neighborhoods and communities. Such places were typically self-sufficient, with businesses, schools, and churches providing residents with necessary goods...
    • Concrete privacy in the Madmen era

    • 2013
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • Originally found in high architectural designs, screen walls made of pierced, decorative concrete masonry units became ubiquitous across the American suburban landscape by the Atomic Age (1950s-1960s). This brief examines the history, application,...
    • Nooks & butler's pantries: A call for the original multi-taskers

    • 2014
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • Changes over time to American residential needs and preferences can perhaps best be seen in the evolution of the kitchen. At the turn of the twentieth century, one such preference was the incorporation of breakfast nooks and butler's pantries to...
    • Saving an American dream: Historic manufactured housing

    • 2013
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • Manufactured homes are unique to the American physical and architectural landscape, as they are uncommon and often banned for use as permanent housing outside the United States. This brief examines the history of American manufactured housing,...
    • Old house, new future: The revitalization of the shotgun house

    • 2019
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • Shotgun houses are the most widely acknowledged expression of African-American architectural design in the United States, rooted in indigenous west African architectural and spatial traditions, and traced from west Africa to Haiti and on to New...
    • Future so bright: A history of neon signage

    • 2017
    • CC066 The Historic Dimension Series
    • Neon signage has fallen in and out of favor since its invention in the early 20th century. At first considered a necessary form of commercial advertising and later deemed tacky and obtrusive, today it is experiencing a resurgence as an artistic...
    • Oral history interview with Jo Ramsay Leimenstoll, 2018

    • 2018-08-13
    • UNCG Institutional Memory Collection
    • Jo Ramsay Leimenstoll was born September 9, 1951 on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She attended UNC Chapel Hill and NC State University, where she received her BFA in Studio Art and her Master of Architecture degrees respectively. Professor...
    • [Images from Pine Needles, 1969]

    • 1969
    • University Yearbooks (Civil Rights Clippings)
    • The 1969 UNCG yearbook, Pine Needles, depicts a growing African American presence on campus amid a continued awareness of social issues. This selection of pages gives a glimpse at race relations and civil rights issues on campus during the...
    • [Man in front of Keeley Institute sign]

    • 1951-03-01
    • Martin Studio Collection
    • March 1, 1951. 4:30 p.m. Keeley Institute was founded in about 1900 when it bought Blandwood Mansion from the Morhead family, whose patriarch, former Gov. John Motley Morehead, died in 1866. Keeley made some changes to the mansion's exterior,...
    • [Man and squirrel]

    • 1952-03-02
    • Martin Studio Collection
    • March 1, 1951. 2 negs. 4:30 p.m. Keeley Institute was founded in about 1900 when it bought Blandwood Mansion from the Morhead family, whose patriarch, former Gov. John Motley Morehead, died in 1866. Keeley made some changes to the mansion's...
    • [Keeley Institute]

    • 1903
    • Greensboro Pictorials Collection
    • Interior view of the Keeley Institute, located at 447 West Washington Street in Greensboro. The institute was housed in Blandwood, the former home of Governor John Motley Morehead, which is now a museum operated by Preservation...
    • Keeley Institute -- winter

    • 1904-1905
    • Greensboro Pictorials Collection
    • Exterior view of the Keeley Institute, located at 447 West Washington Street in Greensboro. The institute was housed in Blandwood, the former home of Governor John Motley Morehead, which is now a museum operated by Preservation...
    • View of the Keeley Institute, Greensboro, N.C.

    • 1908
    • Greensboro Pictorials Collection
    • Exterior view of the Keeley Institute campus, located at 447 West Washington Street in Greensboro. The institute was housed in Blandwood, the former home of Governor John Motley Morehead, which is now a museum operated by Preservation...

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